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The Romantic Walking Route in Verona

Since Shakespeare wrote his tragic love story about Romeo and Juliet, the city of Verona immediately became one of the most romantic cities in the world. In the city today, you can still find the places where Shakespeare found his inspiration in 1597 for the story. In this romantic walking route through Verona, you’ll stroll the streets and sights where the play for the two star-crossed lovers takes place.


Route info

  • Route name: The Romantic Romeo & Juliet Walking Route in Verona
  • Duration: 1 day
  • Best by walking
  • Highlights: Juliet’s House, the House of Romeo, and romantic squares and places where you can find memories of the tragic love story of Romeo and Juliet.


Find out more about all the places to eat, drink, and sleep with activities in the city, in the travel guide Romantisch Verona (NL language), written by Harmke Kraak. Download the guide for €4,99 for more interactive maps, offline spots, and synced information.



The Romantic Walking Route in Verona

The play takes place in the 14th century when the river Adige and the city walls embraced the old city center of Verona – the residential area of the noble families. At a short distance from Piazza delle Erbe, the two rival noble families Montague and Capulet lived close to each other.


The route starts at the place where it all began: Juliet’s House. Juliet was living in a brick house with a gothic gate, at n° 23 of Via Cappello. You can still visit Juliet’s House nowadays. From their garden, you can still see the balcony where Romeo performed his famous serenade and declared his love for her, despite the two family’s feud. When you visit the house, you can see several furniture pieces and paintings from that time, and admire some ancient engravings which displays the tragic love story of Romeo and Juliet. Many others leave love letters in the wall underneath the balcony, hoping for an answer from the Juliet Club. Addressed to “Juliet, Verona” 50,000 letters from all over the world arrive on the doorstep of Juliet per year, where a group of volunteers replies the letters.




Juliet's Balcony


After visiting Juliet’s House, walk a bit further to the House of Romeo, a medieval building that is owned by the family of the Count Nagorola. Walk around the red-bricked houses and squares of Piazza delle Erbe and Piazza dei Signori, you can picture Romeo and Juliet falling in love in this romantic setting and the buzzing life of the city. The old squares were the commercial trade centers in the time of the Romans.


Continue your route by walking passed the Case Mazzanti, towards the side of Piazza delle Erbe, to find the spot where the duel between Tybalt and Mercutio most likely took place: Volto Barbaro. This dual is not to be mistaken by the dual for Romeo’s revenge for the death of Mercutio that presumably took place along Corso Porta Borsari. The Palazzo Carlotti, in front of Porta Borsari, and still shows an inscription remembering this second dual. Romeo and Juliet’s storyline is strongly connected to the political events of the 14th century. The ruler of the city at that time, Bartolomeo Della Scala, banished the young Romeo Montague from Verona to Mantua at the Cortile del Mercato Vecchio, a Communal Palace. You can visit the palace and its beautiful stairs “Scala della Ragione”.


At the city walls of Piazza Bra, called Portoni della Bra, you can find the bronze bust statue of William Shakespeare. Piazza Bra is the largest square in Verona and some say even the largest of Italy. This square is also the place where you can find the 2000-year-old Arena where famous operas are performed.


The final destination of this sad love story, and walking route, leads to Juliet’s tomb, inside the crypt of the San Francesco al Corso monastery. This is about a 15 min walk and a 'long' stretch compared to the beginning of the route which navigated through small living quarters of Verona. This is the place where Juliet was buried. According to the legend, romantic tourists from all over the world visit the red marble sarcophagus from the 16th century every year. Despite the fact that Romeo and Juliet couldn’t be buried together as Romeo was accused of being a murderer and his burial place had to be outside of the city walls, he is not too far away from his lover. You can find Romeo's tomb at n° 6 of Via Luigi da Porto near the communal walls. Verona is the perfect place that stands between reality and legends.


Find out more about all the places to eat, drink, and sleep with activities in the city, in the travel guide Romantisch Verona (NL language), written by Harmke Kraak. Download the guide for €4,99 for more interactive maps, offline spots, and synced information.



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