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Canal Route through The Hague

The Hague is known as the city of peace and justice, and also the seat of Parliament of the Netherlands. But many travelers who visit The Hague often overlook the beauty of its 400-year-old waterways that traverse through the city - much of it has been converted into roads. While Amsterdam, Utrecht, and Delft are renowned for their canal systems, The Hague’s should not be neglected either. We’ll take you on a Canal Route in The Hague, while many of the canals are no longer functioning, it a nice stroll to take in the city’s wonderful charms.

Get more routes of The Hague in ‘Stedentrip Den Haag’ (NL) by Henriette Bokslag. Filled with maps, GSP location, recommendations of hotspots, restaurants, accommodation, and attractions, with offline capability. Plan your trip to The Hague in advance by booking your attraction tickets ahead with Skip The Line, making your trip efficient and affordable.

Route info

  • Route name:The Canal Route through The Hague
  • Suggest duration: 1 day
  • Best by foot
  • Highlights: Bierkade, Chinatown, The Hague Market, Van Kleef, and Mauritshuis.

Canal Route through The Hague


If you’re arriving by train, get off at Den Haag Holland Spoor and walk to The Hague Tower, which is our first landmark of the route. The building is inspired by the ‘Flatiron’ architecture, similar to the iconic building in New York City. You can decide to pop up to the 42nd floor to take in the view of the entire city and beyond (tickets are €8), even of Rotterdam.






After your sky-shattering view of The Hague, make your way to the Bierkade, a beautiful and historic canal in the city center. If you want to experience The Hague by water, take De Ooievaart 90-minute boat trip around the waterways (April-October only). It might come as a surprise, but back in the 17th century, it was illegal to brew beer in The Hague because it wasn’t considered a city. This made Bierkade a significant quay because all beers were brought to the area from Delft and sold by ‘bierstekers,' or beer blenders. It was only until King Louis Napoleon granted city rights to The Hague when it could finally brew its own beers.

After completing the boat tour, walk through the city’s eclectic Chinatown. The two iconic white lion pillars and glistening orange tiled roof will welcome you to one of the most diverse parts of the city. You’re in for a treat with an array of Asian, Middle Eastern and Surinamese restaurants, grocery stores, souvenir boutiques and also the Filmhuis on Spui street. You can pop into a Chinese restaurant to try a Dim Sum brunch or check out the popular Vietnamese restaurant Little V for some traditional Vietnamese drip coffee or their refreshing cocktails.






Continuing onto our next stop, which is the The Hague Market, just outside of the main city center on Herman Costerstraat. The open market offers an array of local and exotic produce, organic goods, clothing, fresh flowers, and food stalls. The diversity of the products is a direct reflection of the community that lives and works in The Hague, diverse in its multicultural fabric. After the open market, it’s only a short walk to discover one of the best-kept secrets of the city, the Van Ostade Jewish Housing Project. A set of 200 brick houses built between 1885 and 1895 to accommodate the Jewish population in the city that were living in poor living conditions. Today, it is a gated community that has shown much resilience and retains its 19th-century architecture.

Make your way back to the city center and expand your knowledge on Dutch alcohol by visiting Van Kleef, the last working distillery in The Hague that produces genever and liqueur. Step into the store decorated with brown wood interior and rows of liquor bottles sitting on the shelves. You can sample many of the spirits that were made with trade old original recipes, or take a tour of the distillery facility to learn how The Hague was one of the top producers of alcohol in the Netherlands.






Continue your stroll down the Lange Beestenmarkt towards the Grotemarkt, where you can have drink of your choice at one of the many establishments in the square. For a grand café experience, sit outside on the terrace at the historic de Boterwaag, where you can continue to watch the Haagse livelihood pass by, or Hoender & Hop for a strong pint of beer, or if you want to sip on some fun cocktail, Vavoom is the place you want to check out.

End your day at the Hofvrijver, where you can take a stroll along the footpath around the beautiful pond. To the south of the pond, there is the Binnenhof, the large govenment complex that houses the Prime Minister's office and both houses of the State General of the Netherlands. Then, there is the Mauritshuis, an art museum with a collection of 841 paintings, with the most famous one being the Girl with the Pearl Earrings.

Get many more routes of The Hague in ‘Stedentrip Den Haag’ (NL) by Henriette Bokslag. Filled with maps, GSP location, recommendations of hotspots, restaurants, accommodation, and attractions, with offline capability.Plan your trip to The Hague in advance by booking your attraction tickets ahead with Skip The Line, making your trip efficient and affordable.


Suggested reading for The Netherlands:


Chinatown




Grote Markt



Grote Markt

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